THE TURNING

Rating: MA15+
Year: 2013
Length: 180 minutes
Genre: Short stories, Art House & International, Drama, Australian
Rating: MA15+ 180' strong coarse language
Cast: Hugo Weaving, Rose Byrne,Cate Blanchett, Miranda Otto, Richard Roxburgh, Callan Mulvey, Susie Porter, Myles Pollard, Dan Wyllie, Robyn Nevin, Harrison Gilbertson, James Fraser, Matt Nable, Oscar Redding
Director: Jonathan Auf Der Heide , Tony Ayres
Synopsis:
THE TURNING is a unique cinema event.
Seventeen talented Australian directors from diverse artistic disciplines each create a chapter of the hauntingly beautiful novel by multi award-winning author Tim Winton. The linking and overlapping stories explore the extraordinary turning points in ordinary people’s lives in a stunning portrait of a small coastal community. As characters face second thoughts and regret, relationships irretrievably alter, resolves are made or broken, and lives change direction forever. This watershed film reinterprets and re-imagines the work for the screen.
Reviews:
"one of the achievements of The Turning is how well-crafted, cohesive and satisfying it is as a film. Despite its sprawling ambition and daunting runtime, it's surprisingly light on its feet – engaging, entertaining and frequently mesmerising throughout.... It also effectively recreates the experience of being sucked into a top-notch short-story cycle by a gifted author. While most episodes here would stand alone, it's hard to recall another omnibus film with such narrative unity. Characters re-appear in different episodes at different stages of their lives, fleshed out in snapshots that explore recurring themes from different angles. In that sense it works a bit like a TV series, where different creative teams adhere to one master vision (with Connolly as showrunner, perhaps). The different disciplinary approaches and mixed media generally keep things fresh and interesting. It's also a beautifully, unapologetically Australian film, imbued with the rhythm and detail of life in the remote coastal towns and hinterlands of Winton's home in Western Australia. The lives of fishermen, surfers, AFL players, the working class and angst-ridden suburbanites are chronicled with sometimes dark themes, including alcoholism, child homicide and police corruption. A number of key episodes feature Aboriginal characters and symbols. Though the film courts the mystical, it's grounded with romance and macabre suspense." Jim Poe The Guardian
"This is a work of great artistic accomplishment that marks a milestone in Australian cinema." Meghan Lehmann The Hollywood Reporter
"To adapt the collection into a single cinematic event, let alone with each chapter made by a different team of creators and actors, seems a grandly ambitious goal. Yet the mastermind behind the project, director and producer Robert Connolly (Balibo, The Bank), has succeeded not only in bringing together surely the largest assembly of Australian filmmaking and acting talent ever involved in a single project, but also in producing a work that maintains a remarkably consistent tone throughout – one of melancholy, regret, and longing." Rochelle Siemienowicz SBS
* Cry Baby Session